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‘The Fall of the House of Usher’: Mike Flanagan Points Out a Detail Some Viewers Missed

As fans eagerly dive into the chilling world of “The Fall of the House of Usher,” showrunner Mike Flanagan has taken to social media to address a burning question from a curious viewer. In a recent tweet, Flanagan clarifies the fate of a feline character that sparked intrigue among fans.

The question centered around a gory battle between the ill-fated Leo and a black cat named Pluto in episode four, loosely based on Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Black Cat.” Flanagan wanted to make it clear that the replacement cat seen later in the episode is merely a hallucination caused by the mysterious Verna, and that Pluto is indeed alive and well.

Flanagan’s version of the story deviates from Poe’s original, where the cat meets a tragic end. In Flanagan’s adaptation, the killing of the cat is revealed to be a hallucination, leaving the cat unharmed. The showrunner playfully asks, “So who hates cats?”

For those seeking confirmation of the hallucination reveal, Flanagan points to subtle clues in the episode, such as the cat wearing a Gucci collar and the empty bathtub, indicating that all the animal violence was imagined.

Flanagan’s attention to animal welfare in the series has not gone unnoticed. PETA has awarded him the “F—k Around (With Animals) and Find Out” award for shedding light on the cruelty of experiments on nonhuman primates and other animals in episode three, “Murder in the Rue Morgue.”

While Poe’s original story features the death of the first cat, the second cat’s fate remains ambiguous. Flanagan’s adaptation keeps the second cat alive, adding another layer of mystery to the narrative.

For fans seeking more connections between “The Fall of the House of Usher” and Poe’s work, there are numerous references to explore throughout the series.

The Fall of the House of Usher, a Netflix horror series, has sparked some controversy among fans regarding the fate of a cat in one of its episodes. Showrunner Mike Flanagan recently took to Twitter to address this burning question and clarify the situation.

The Burning Question

A fan asked Flanagan, “What did cats ever do to you?” in reference to a gory battle between a character named Leo and a black cat named Pluto in episode four. This episode is loosely based on Edgar Allan Poe’s short story, “The Black Cat.”

Flanagan’s Clarification

Flanagan wanted to make it clear that the replacement cat seen in the episode is entirely a hallucination caused by the character Verna. He emphasized that Pluto, the original cat, is alive and well. He explained that in Poe’s version of the story, a cat is killed, but in his version, the killing of the cat is revealed to be a hallucination.

Flanagan further pointed out that the distinction between the two cats is highlighted in the episode. Pluto is shown wearing a Gucci collar, while the replacement cat is not. The final shot of the episode features the cat wearing the collar, indicating that all the animal violence depicted was imagined.

PETA’s Recognition

On a related note, PETA (People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals) announced that Flanagan will be receiving their “F—k Around (With Animals) and Find Out” award for spotlighting the cruelty and pointlessness of experiments on nonhuman primates and other animals in episode three, “Murder in the Rue Morgue.”

Poe’s Original Story

In Poe’s original story, a man mistreats his pets, including a cat named Pluto, who dies. Feeling guilty, he adopts a seemingly identical cat but begins to loathe it and eventually tries to kill it as well. When his wife intervenes, he kills her and hides the body. The howls of the cat eventually lead the police to discover the corpse. So, in Poe’s version, the first cat dies, but the second cat, which may or may not be real, survives.

These connections between The Fall of the House of Usher and Poe’s work add depth and intrigue to the series for fans of both literature and horror.

Explanation of the Cat Situation

In order to fully understand the cat situation in The Fall of the House of Usher, it is important to delve into the references to Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Black Cat” and the clarification provided by showrunner Mike Flanagan.

Reference to Edgar Allan Poe’s “The Black Cat”

The episode in question draws inspiration from Poe’s renowned short story, “The Black Cat.” In Poe’s version, a cat is killed, which serves as a pivotal element in the narrative. Flanagan’s adaptation takes inspiration from this aspect of the story but adds a twist to the fate of the cat.

Clarification of the Cat’s Fate

Flanagan clarifies that in his version of the story, the killing of the cat is revealed to be a hallucination. This means that the cat, named Pluto, is actually alive and well. The replacement cat seen in the episode is entirely a product of Verna’s manipulation, causing hallucinations in the characters.

Flanagan emphasizes the significance of the visual cues in the episode to differentiate between the two cats. Pluto is shown wearing a distinctive Gucci collar, while the replacement cat does not have this collar. The final shot of the episode features the cat wearing the collar, indicating that all the violence towards animals depicted in the episode was imagined.

This clarification from Flanagan aims to address the concerns and confusion among fans regarding the fate of the cat and to provide a deeper understanding of the narrative choices made in the series.

Revealing the Hallucination

In The Fall of the House of Usher, the revelation of the cat’s hallucination adds an intriguing layer to the storyline. This twist not only challenges the viewers’ perception but also highlights the psychological elements at play in the series.

Importance of the Gucci Collar

One of the key visual cues that Flanagan uses to differentiate between the real cat, Pluto, and the hallucination is the Gucci collar. The collar serves as a symbol of identification and distinction. Pluto is shown wearing the Gucci collar, indicating his existence as a real cat in the story. On the other hand, the replacement cat, which is a product of Verna’s manipulation, does not possess this distinctive collar.

By emphasizing the presence of the Gucci collar, Flanagan draws attention to the significance of material possessions and their role in distinguishing reality from illusion within the narrative.

Visual Clues in the Final Shot

The final shot of the episode holds important visual clues that reinforce the revelation of the cat’s hallucination. As viewers, we are directed to pay close attention to the cat wearing the Gucci collar in the final shot. This serves as a confirmation that Pluto, the original cat, is indeed alive and well.

Additionally, the empty bathtub in the final shot further supports the idea that all the instances of animal violence depicted throughout the episode were mere figments of the characters’ imagination. The absence of any evidence of harm or struggle in the bathtub suggests that the violent events involving the cat were not real.

These visual clues not only provide closure to the cat controversy but also contribute to the overall thematic exploration of perception, reality, and the power of the mind in The Fall of the House of Usher.

PETA Award and Animal Cruelty

The Fall of the House of Usher has garnered attention not only for its storytelling but also for its exploration of animal cruelty. This theme has led to recognition from PETA and a connection to Edgar Allan Poe’s original story, “The Black Cat.”

PETA’s Recognition of Flanagan’s Episode

PETA, an organization dedicated to the ethical treatment of animals, has acknowledged showrunner Mike Flanagan for his portrayal of animal cruelty in episode three, titled “Murder in the Rue Morgue.” The episode sheds light on the cruelty and pointlessness of experiments conducted on nonhuman primates and other animals.

By addressing this issue, Flanagan brings attention to the ethical implications of such experiments and raises awareness about the mistreatment of animals in scientific research.

Connection to Poe’s Original Story

The exploration of animal cruelty in The Fall of the House of Usher also draws a connection to Edgar Allan Poe’s original story, “The Black Cat.” In Poe’s tale, the protagonist mistreats his pets, including a cat named Pluto, which ultimately leads to tragic consequences.

Flanagan’s adaptation incorporates elements from Poe’s story, highlighting the consequences of animal cruelty and the guilt that can arise from mistreating innocent creatures. This connection adds depth to the narrative and underscores the themes of guilt, remorse, and the consequences of one’s actions.

By intertwining the themes of animal cruelty and Poe’s work, The Fall of the House of Usher prompts viewers to reflect on the treatment of animals and the moral implications of their actions.

Conclusion

The Fall of the House of Usher not only captivates audiences with its gripping storyline and exploration of digital technology but also offers intriguing connections to the works of Edgar Allan Poe. From the cat controversy to the themes of animal cruelty, the series weaves elements of Poe’s stories into its narrative, adding depth and complexity to the overall viewing experience.

Further Connections Between “The Fall of the House of Usher” and Poe’s Work

While the cat controversy and the exploration of animal cruelty are prominent connections to Poe’s work, there are further elements that tie The Fall of the House of Usher to the literary master’s stories.

Throughout the series, viewers can discover various references and allusions to Poe’s works, such as “The Fall of the House of Usher,” “The Black Cat,” and “Murder in the Rue Morgue.” These connections serve as a homage to Poe’s legacy and provide an additional layer of enjoyment for fans of his literature.

Moreover, the series delves into psychological themes, exploring the depths of the human mind and the impact of guilt, fear, and obsession. These themes resonate with Poe’s own exploration of the human psyche in his stories, creating a parallel between the series and the literary genius.

By intertwining elements of Poe’s work with modern storytelling and digital technology, The Fall of the House of Usher offers a unique viewing experience that pays homage to the literary tradition while pushing the boundaries of the horror genre.

The showrunner of “The Fall of the House of Usher,” Mike Flanagan, took to Twitter to clarify a burning question from a fan regarding a cat in episode four. Flanagan wanted to make it clear that the cat’s death was revealed to be a hallucination, and the cat named Pluto is alive and well. He emphasized the significance of the cat wearing a Gucci collar in the final shot of the episode, indicating that all animal violence was imagined. In other news, Flanagan is receiving an award from PETA for spotlighting animal cruelty in episode three. Discover more connections between “The Fall of the House of Usher” and Edgar Allan Poe’s work.

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the clarification regarding the cat in “The Fall of the House of Usher”?

The showrunner, Mike Flanagan, clarified that the cat named Pluto is alive and well in his version of the story. The replacement cat that appears later in the episode is revealed to be a hallucination caused by a character named Verna.

When does it get revealed that the cat’s death was a hallucination?

The revelation that the cat’s death was a hallucination occurs in the episode itself. It is indicated by the presence of the original cat, Pluto, wearing a Gucci collar in the final shot, and the empty bathtub, suggesting that all the animal violence was imagined.

What is the connection between “The Fall of the House of Usher” and Edgar Allan Poe’s original story “The Black Cat”?

While Poe’s original story involves the death of a cat named Pluto, in Mike Flanagan’s version, the cat is revealed to be alive and well. The show draws inspiration from Poe’s work but deviates from the original story by introducing hallucinations and a different outcome for the cat.

Why is Mike Flanagan receiving an award from PETA?

Mike Flanagan is receiving PETA’s “F—k Around (With Animals) and Find Out” award for spotlighting the cruelty and pointlessness of experiments on nonhuman primates and other animals in episode three of the show, titled “Murder in the Rue Morgue.”

Are there other connections between “The Fall of the House of Usher” and Edgar Allan Poe’s works?

Yes, there are several references to Poe’s works throughout the show. For more information on these connections, you can explore a list of Poe references in “The Fall of the House of Usher.”

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